A Long Road

May 26, 2017

Black, oily smoke poured from his nose as he sighed. The view from the end of the pass looked down on the foothills of the Tarthian mountains and seemed to frame the village of Missran perfectly. The steep peaks of the houses, the domed Temple of the Law set into the mountain herself, and the humming of the Machineshrine built on top of their modest Vent. The only reason this town was here.

His pipe hung loosely in his mouth, working around the grimace he carried from the extreme cold of the mountain. The spines of his mecka seemed to twist and grind in the cold lately and the weight bearing on his leg didn’t help. His arm, at least, he could carry in a sling.

He grasped he cart jerked his head a bit to his mecka cart and headed down the winding switchbacks toward Missran, a filmy haze of greasesmoke trailing behind him as if to warn the others out there. The others in the deep pine forests spotted with powerful redwoods that seemed to guard the woods.

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He’s a Magic Man

May 15, 2017

Oof, magic. The biggest elephant in any Dungeons and Dragons shaped 10×10 room with an orc in it.

The problems with D&D’s traditional magic system are both numerous and arcane (hah!) and there’s no silver bullet to them. The answer, I think, is both complicated and difficult but it starts very simply – we need to make each style of magic mechanically different. The two biggest ones, the ones I’m going to talk about here, are Divine and Arcane magic – the focus of the Accolyte and Arcanist classes and all the classes that spawn from them – clerics, wizards, warlocks, paladins, etc.

The first change, I think, goes into how the spells manifest. Arcane spells in this system are going to be mutable, modifiable, and customizable – a reflection of the experimentation and examination that goes into making Arcane magic work. Divine magic, though, is more rooted in the powers they come from. There is no changing the prayers that summon them, and there is no adjusting the expression of that power.

So, details wise, what does this mean?

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Experience Your Life

May 12, 2017

“No, sir, everything’s been tested thoroughly. Let me explain how it works.”

The Nhanced Awareness clinic was clean and highlighted in comforting greys and blues, with each of the clinicians wearing smart, fitted lab frocks with the Nhance logo emblazoned over their hearts. An example of the device itself, a strange collar looking device with several spines protruding toward its center like a medieval torture device but in medical-grade plastics and platinum alloys, was suspended in a glass case in the center of the waiting room. Around it were hung posters of people enjoying the interface of the device suspended in the air infront of them, a layer of communications and news gently enhancing their everyday life.

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No, not Super Smash Brothers, but those are good games. Yes, even Brawl. Melee is only a better game because it’s literally broken. Some of us, also, don’t have weird monster fingers that can move at half the speed of light over face buttons.

This is going to be about a game idea I’ve been kicking around for a while; a cheap, easy miniatures game that is oriented around relatively fast games (think 30 to 60 minutes) between two people who are piloting a small group of fighters who get into a fight in a confined space. This could be an alleyway in Prague, the main thoroughfair of Shanghai, a valley in Arizona, or the deck of a ship anchored in London. Each team is composed of 4 to 6 fighters who primarily use melee weapons and tactics, with the occasional slow or limited ranged weapon (bows, black-powder era guns, or a possible sawed off shotgun with limited ammo).

Each team will have points printed with them so that they can be mixed and matched but the initial experience design will be on the teams printed as they are.

So, what kind of teams am I thinking?

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The Form is Formless

April 14, 2017

Brawlers, unlike the Rogues and Fighters, do not rely on Tricks or Strategems going into combat. Instead, they have practiced combat from every angle, in so many situations, that they rely intently on their natural responses. They do not think, they have trained their body beyond thinking. They do not plan, they have honed their minds into the moment where plans are not needed. They do not hesitate, they have trained themselves to trust their body’s actions and follow through. They use Forms to plan their actions in the grandest sense, placing their bodies in positions to take advantage of their extensive experience.

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The Rogue’s Surprise

April 12, 2017

Fighters might use Stratagem to outsmart and outwit their opponents with planning and quick action, but Rogues try to outsmart their opponents before their opponents even have a chance to act. Rogues use these Tricks to demoralize, undermine, and break their opponents using only their own guile.

These techniques are easy to see, and perhaps even replicate, but only someone who has a true insight into the body, into the weapon, and into the understanding of their foes can understand the Trick behind them.

Rogues, whether the practiced assassin or the intrepid dungeon-delving adventurer, are all possessed of this unique insight.

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Fighting Strategically

April 10, 2017

So we have a bit of a basis for understanding the Combat Economy. We know the limitations of a single character in the abstract (Move, Act, Fast Act, Say Something), and we have a way to discuss the outcomes of a character (Damage Per Round, Healing Per Round, Action Efficiency). So we can now start talking about actual abilities that characters have because they use this framework…and sometimes exploit it.

Exploitation, in fact, is the theme of the Fighter’s abilities. We’re calling them Stratagems, the kinds of combat strategy that lets Fighters exploit their enemies’ actions, placement, and decisions in the thick of combat.

So what is a Stratagem?

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